Shoulder Osteoarthritis

Arthrose de l'épaule : évaluation de l'acupuncture

1. Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis

2. Clinical Practice Guidelines

⊕ positive recommendation (regardless of the level of evidence reported)
Ø negative recommendation, (or lack of evidence)

2.1. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS, USA) 2020 Ø

Management of Glenohumeral Joint Osteoarthritis. Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). 2020;:76P. [211290]. URL.

In the absence of reliable evidence, the work group cannot recommend for or against the use of the following: Acupuncture Dry needling Cannabis Cannabodiol (CBD) oil Capsaicin Shark cartilage Glucosamine and chondroitin Cupping Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS)

2.2. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS, USA) 2009 Ø

The Treatment of Glenohumeral Joint Osteoarthritis Guideline and Evidence Report. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). 2009;:201p. [197818].

RECOMMENDATION 1 We are unable to recommend for or against physical therapy in the initial treatment of patients with osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint. AAOS Strength of Recommendation: Inconclusive Definition: An Inconclusive recommendation means that there is a lack of compelling evidence resulting in an unclear balance between benefits and potential harm. Implications: Practitioners should feel little constraint in deciding whether to follow a recommendation labeled as Inconclusive and should exercise judgment and be alert to future publications that clarify existing evidence for determining balance of benefits versus potential harm. Patient preference should have a substantial influencing rôle.
Rationale: Despite an exhaustive review of the literature, there was insufficient evidence to make conclusions either in favor of or against the efficacy of physical therapy. This includes the modalities of massage, joint mobilization, joint manipulation, exercise, phonophoresis, iontophoresis, ultrasound, laser, acupuncture, and/or electrical stimulation, in the treatment of patients with osteoarthritis of the shoulder. Further, no studies of sufficient quality were found that addressed massage therapy, hydrotherapy, manual therapy and/or mobilization and manipulation. Supporting Evidence There were no studies of sufficient quality identified that examined the use of massage, joint mobilization, joint manipulation, exercise, phonophoresis, iontophoresis, ultrasound, laser treatments, acupuncture, and/or electrical stimulation. In patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis. Further, no studies of sufficient quality were found that addressed massage therapy, hydrotherapy, manual therapy and/or mobilization and manipulation.