Sommaire

Nausées-vomissements post-chimiothérapie : évaluation de l'acupuncture

☆☆☆ Preuves en faveur d’une efficacité et d’un effet spécifique de l’acupuncture
☆☆ Preuves en faveur d’une efficacité de l’acupuncture
Preuves limitées en faveur d’une efficacité de l’acupuncture
Ø Absence de preuve ou preuves insuffisantes

4. Revues systématiques et méta-analyses

4.1. Acupuncture générique

4.1.1. Lian 2014 ☆☆

Lian WL, Pan MQ, Zhou DH, Zhang ZJ. Effectiveness of acupuncture for palliative care in cancer patients: a systematic review. Chin J Integr Med. 2014.20(2):136-47. [160304].

ObjectiveTo critically evaluate the currently available randomized clinical trials regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture in palliative care for cancer patients, hence, to provide sufficient evidences for the widespread use of acupuncture in cancer treatment.
MethodsTwo independent reviewers extracted data from all of the randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that assessed the efficacy of acupuncture in palliative care for cancer patients. Seven databases were searched from their respective inception to December 2010. All eligible trials identified were evaluated by two independent reviewers using the Jadad scale, and data from the articles were validated and extracted.
ResultsIn total, 33 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The effects of acupuncture on different cancer-related aspects were shown, including chemotherapy or radiotherapy-induced side effects (13/33, 39.4%), cancer pain (6/33, 18.2%), post-operative urinary retention (4/33, 12.1%), quality of life (2/33, 6.1%), vasomotor syndrome (2/33, 6.1%), post-operative gastrointestinal dysfunction (2/33, 6.1%), prevention of prolonged postoperative ileus (2/33, 6.1%), joint symptoms (1/33, 3.0%), and immunomodulation (1/33, 3.0%).
Conclusions The result of our systematic review suggested that the effectiveness of acupuncture in palliative care for cancer patients is promising, especially in reducing chemotherapy or radiotherapy-induced side effects and cancer pain. Acupuncture may be an appropriate adjunctive treatment for palliative care.

4.1.2. Mckeon 2013 ☆☆

Mckeon C, Smith CA, Hardy J, Chang E. Acupuncture and acupressure for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a systematic review. Aust J Acupunct Chin Med. 2013. 8(1):2-27. [160092].

Background Control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) has improved with advances in antiemetics, such as NK1 antagonists. Despite these advances, patients still experience these symptoms, and expert panels encourage additional methods to reduce these symptoms.
ObjectivesThe objective was to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupressure on acute and delayed CINV in cancer patients.
Methods Search strategy: The following databases were searched: AMED, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, Cochrane Controlled Trials Registry, and Science Direct. The search was undertaken from the inception of the database to January 2012. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews of acupoint stimulation by needles, electrical stimulation or acupressure (excluding laser, point injection and non-invasive electrostimulation) and assessing chemotherapy-induced nausea or vomiting, or both. Data collection and analysis: Data was provided by publications of original trials and pooled. Standardised mean differences with confidence incidences were calculated.
Main resultsSeven trials were pooled for acupuncture and six for acupressure. Acupuncture reduced the frequency of acute vomiting (mean difference [MD] -7.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] -9.07 to -5.72), but did not reduce acute nausea severity or frequency compared to control. Delayed symptoms for acupuncture were not reported. Acupuncture showed a reduction in the dose of rescue medication (MD -5.52, 95% CI -7.45 to -3.58). Acupressure showed a decrease in frequency of nausea (MD -0.32, 95% CI -0.59 to 0.06) but not acute vomiting or delayed symptoms. All trials used state-of-the-art combination antiemetics, except for the early electroacupuncture trials.
Authors’ conclusionsAcupuncture has demonstrated some benefit for chemotherapy-induced acute vomiting by reducing the frequency of vomiting and reducing the use of rescue medication, while acupressure has shown a decrease in the frequency of nausea. Further trials of acupuncture and acupressure for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with refractory symptoms are needed before recommendations for clinical practice can be made. Future trials must be sufficiently powered, as this remains a major flaw with the majority of studies to date.

4.1.3. Garcia 2013 ☆

Garcia MK, Mcquade J, Haddad R, Patel S, Lee R, Yang P, Palmer JL, Cohen L. Systematic review of acupuncture in cancer care: a synthesis of the evidence. J Clin Oncol. 2013. 31(7):952-60. [157620].

Purpose Many cancer centers offer acupuncture services. To date, a comprehensive systematic review of acupuncture in cancer care has not been conducted. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for symptom management in patients with cancer.
Methods Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane (all databases), Scopus, and PubMed were searched from inception through December 2011 for prospective randomized clinical trials (RCT) evaluating acupuncture for symptom management in cancer care. Only studies involving needle insertion into acupuncture points were included. No language limitations were applied. Studies were assessed for risk of bias (ROB) according to Cochrane criteria. Outcomes by symptom were designated as positive, negative, or unclear.
Results A total of 2,151 publications were screened. Of those, 41 RCTs involving eight symptoms (pain, nausea, hot flashes, fatigue, radiation-induced xerostomia, prolonged postoperative ileus, anxiety/mood disorders, and sleep disturbance) met all inclusion criteria. One positive trial of acupuncture for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting had low ROB. Of the remaining studies, eight had unclear ROB (four positive, three negative, and one with unclear outcomes). Thirty-three studies had high ROB (19 positive, 11 negative, and three with both positive and negative outcomes depending on the symptom).
Conclusion Acupuncture is an appropriate adjunctive treatment for chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, but additional studies are needed. For other symptoms, efficacy remains undetermined owing to high ROB among studies. Future research should focus on standardizing comparison groups and treatment methods, be at least single-blinded, assess biologic mechanisms, have adequate statistical power, and involve multiple acupuncturists.

4.1.4. Silva 2009 ☆☆

Silva, Dacirene Ribeiro França; Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz; Gomes, Isabelle Pimentel Gomes; Funghetto, Silvana Schwerz; Ponce de Leon, Casandra G. R. M. [Non Pharmacological Interventions for Chemotherapy Induced Nauseas and Vomits: integrative review]. Online Brazilian Journal of Nursing. 2009;8(1):. [99711].

Background Nausea and vomiting are one of the most common gastrointestinal toxicities of antineoplastic treatment; it may affect negatively patient`s nutritional condition, hidroeletrolitic balance and quality of life.
Objective methods This study aimed to identify evidences in medical literature regarding non-pharmacologic interventions to prevent and treat chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. We performed an integrative review on online databases for that purpose.
Results We elected 9 articles from this research, which presented the following possible non-pharmacological interventions for chemotherapy emesis: acupressure, acupuncture, electroacupuncture, relaxing techniques and yoga.
Conclusions The authors concluded that the results suggested that these interventions should be recommended for cancer patients, mainly those presenting chemotherapy emesis in consecutive cycles.

4.1.5. Ezzo 2006 ☆☆

Ezzo JM, Richardson MA, Vickers A, Allen C, Dibble SL, Issell BF, Lao L, Pearl M, Ramirez G, Roscoe J, Shen J, Shivnan JC, Streitberger K, Treish I, Zhang G. Acupuncture-point stimulation for chemotherapy-induced nausea or vomiting. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2006;(2):CD002285.141212

Purpose The objective was to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture-point stimulation on acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in cancer patients.
Methods Search strategy : We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycLIT, MANTIS, Science Citation Index, CCTR (Cochrane Controlled Trials Registry), Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field Trials Register, Cochrane Pain, Palliative Care and Supportive Care Specialized Register, Cochrane Cancer Specialized Register, and conference abstracts. Selection criteria: randomized trials of acupuncture-point stimulation by any method (needles, electrical stimulation, magnets, or acupressure) and assessing chemotherapy-induced nausea or vomiting, or both. Data collection and analysis: Data were provided by investigators of the original trials and pooled using a xed effect model. Relative risks were calculated on dichotomous data. Standardized mean differences were calculated for nausea severity. Weighted mean differences were calculated for number of emetic episodes.
Results Eleven trials (N = 1247) were pooled. Overall, acupuncture-point stimulation of all methods combined reduced the incidence of acute vomiting (RR = 0.82; 95% con dence interval 0.69 to 0.99; P = 0.04), but not acute or delayed nausea severity compared to control. By modality, stimulation with needles reduced proportion of acute vomiting (RR = 0.74; 95% con dence interval 0.58 to 0.94; P = 0.01),but not acute nausea severity. Electroacupuncture reduced the proportion of acute vomiting (RR = 0.76; 95% con dence interval 0.60 to 0.97; P = 0.02), but manual acupuncture did not; delayed symptoms for acupuncture were not reported. Acupressure reduced mean acute nausea severity (SMD = -0.19; 95% con dence interval -0.37 to -0.01; P = 0.04) but not acute vomiting or delayed symptoms. Noninvasive electrostimulation showed no bene t for any outcome. All trials used concomitant pharmacologic antiemetics, and all, except electroacupuncture trials, used state-of-the-art antiemetics.
Conclusion This review complements data on post-operative nausea and vomiting suggesting a biologic effect of acupuncture-point stimulation. Electroacupuncture has demonstrated benefit for chemotherapy-induced acute vomiting, but studies combining electroacupuncture with state-of-the-art antiemetics and in patients with refractory symptoms are needed to determine clinical relevance. Self-administered acupressure appears to have a protective effect for acute nausea and can readily be taught to patients though studies did not involve placebo control.

4.1.6. Ezzo 2005 ☆☆

Ezzo J, Vickers A, Richardson MA, Allen C, Dibble SL, Issell B, Lao L, Pearl M, Ramirez G, Roscoe Ja, Shen J, Shivnan J, Streitberger K, Treish I, Zhang G. Acupuncture-point stimulation for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. J Clin Oncol. 2005. 23(28):7188-98. [140957].

Purpose Assess the effectiveness of acupuncture-point stimulation on acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in cancer patients.
Materials and methods Randomized trials of acupuncture-point stimulation by needles, electrical stimulation, magnets, or acupressure were retrieved. Data were provided by investigators of the original trials and pooled using a fixed-effects model.
Results Eleven trials (N = 1,247) were pooled. Overall, acupuncture-point stimulation reduced the proportion of acute vomiting (relative risks [RR] = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.99; P = .04), but not the mean number of acute emetic episodes or acute or delayed nausea severity compared with controls. By modality, stimulation with needles reduced the proportion of acute vomiting (RR = 0.74; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.94; P = .01), but not acute nausea severity. Electroacupuncture reduced the proportion of acute vomiting (RR = 0.76; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.97; P = .02), but manual acupuncture did not; delayed symptoms were not reported. Acupressure reduced mean acute nausea severity (standardized mean difference = -0.19; 95% CI, -0.38 to -0.01; P = .03) and most severe acute nausea, but not acute vomiting or delayed symptoms. Noninvasive electrostimulation showed no benefit for any outcome. All trials used concomitant pharmacologic antiemetics, and all, except electroacupuncture trials, used state-of-the-art antiemetics.
Conclusion This review complements data on postoperative nausea and vomiting, suggesting a biologic effect of acupuncture-point stimulation. Electroacupuncture has demonstrated benefit for chemotherapy-induced acute vomiting, but studies with state-of-the-art antiemetics as well as studies for refractory symptoms are needed to determine clinical relevance. Acupressure seems to reduce chemotherapy-induced acute nausea severity, though studies did not involve a placebo control. Noninvasive electrostimulation seems unlikely to have a clinically relevant impact when patients are given state-of-the-art pharmacologic antiemetic therapy.

4.2. Techniques particulières

4.2.1. Huang 2017 (moxibustion) Ø

Huang Z, Qin Z, Yao Q, Wang Y, Liu Z. Moxibustion for Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2017. [49920].

BackgroundNausea and vomiting are distressing symptoms for patients receiving chemotherapy. Moxibustion, which involves the use of burning moxa to generate heat and stimulate acupoints, has been reported to potentially ameliorate chemotherapy-induced side effects, particularly nausea and vomiting.
Objectives This systematic review evaluated current evidence on the effectiveness of moxibustion against chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV).
Methods We searched eight online databases and two trial registries for relevant trials. The random-effects model was used to conduct a meta-analysis. Furthermore, the risk ratio (RR) and mean difference (MD) were used to explain dichotomous and continuous outcomes, respectively; the outcomes were within 95% confidence intervals (Cis).
Results The results revealed that moxibustion might more favorably relieve the severity and frequency of CINV, compared with no treatment (RR: 2.04, 95% CI: 1.42-2.93); moxibustion might have stronger effects than antiemetic drugs (RR: 1.87, 95% CI: 1.27-2.76). There is no robust result that moxibustion could enhance the effects of antiemetic drugs administered as a complementary treatment. Actual moxibustion (8.10 ± 10.98) may have more favorable effects than placebo moxibustion (46.67 ± 23.32).
ConclusionsHowever, the evidence obtained is not sufficient because of the lack of strict clinical trials.

4.2.2. Lee 2008 (acupression) ☆

Lee J, Dodd M, Dibble S, Abrams D. Review of acupressure studies for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting control. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2008. 36(5):529-44. [159369].

Objective The purpose of this review was to evaluate the effects of a noninvasive intervention, acupressure, when combined with antiemetics for the control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV).
methods – results Ten controlled acupressure studies were included in this review. The review evaluated one quasi-experimental and nine randomized clinical trials, which included two specific acupressure modalities, that is, acupressure band and finger acupressure. The effects of the acupressure modalities were compared study by study. Four of seven acupressure band trials supported the positive effects of acupressure, whereas three acupressure band trials yielded negative results regarding the possible effects of acupressure; however, all the studies with negative results had methodological issues. In contrast, one quasi-experimental and two randomized finger acupressure trials all supported the positive effects of acupressure on CINV control. The reported effects of the two acupressure modalities in each phase of CINV produced variable results. Acupressure bands were effective in controlling acute nausea, whereas finger acupressure controlled delayed nausea and vomiting. The overall effect of acupressure was strongly suggestive but not conclusive. Differences in the acupressure modality, the emetic potential of chemotherapeutic agents, antiemetic use, and sample characteristics of each study made study-to-study comparisons difficult. Suggestive effects of acupressure, cost-effectiveness, and the noninvasiveness of the interventions encourage researchers to further investigate the efficacy of this modality.
Conclusions Acupressure should be strongly recommended as an effective, nonpharmacologic adjuvant intervention for CINV control if its positive effects are reproduced in future acupressure clinical trials.

4.2.3. Klein 2004 (acupression)☆

Klein J, Griffiths P. Acupressure for nausea and vomiting in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, British Journal of Community Nursing. 2004. 9(9):383-88. [159378].

Background Practitioners working with patients undergoing chemotherapy regularly encourage them to use acupressure in the form of Sea Bands™ for the relief of treatment related nausea and vomiting. This mini-review sets out to uncover and examine the evidence base for this recommendation.
Objective A mini systematic review was carried out to identify randomized controlled trials comparing the use of acupressure plus usual care with usual care alone. The population was adult patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. The outcome was nausea or vomiting duration or intensity.
Methods Searches on Medline, Embase, AMED, the Cochrane Library, Cancerlit and Cinahl identified two randomized controlled trials involving 482 patients which compared acupressure to no intervention control.
Results / conclusion The results suggest that acupressure may decrease nausea among patients undergoing chemotherapy but further work is required before conclusively advising patients on the efficacy of acupressure in preventing and treating chemotherapy induced nausea.

4.3. Formes cliniques particulières

4.3.1. Momani 2017 (enfant) ∼

Momani TG, Berry DL. Integrative Therapeutic Approaches for the Management and Control of Nausea in Children Undergoing Cancer Treatment: A Systematic Review of Literature. J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2017;:173-184. [194926].

Objectives Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) continues to be a common symptom experienced by children undergoing cancer treatment despite the use of contemporary antiemetics. Integrative therapeutic approaches in addition to standard pharmacologic antiemetic regimes offer potential to control CINV. The purpose of this review was to identify current evidence on integrative therapeutic approaches for the control of CINV in children with cancer.
Methods Online search engines (PubMed, CINAHL, PsychINFO) were queried using MESH terms. Titles, abstracts, and then full-text articles were reviewed for relevance to the review.
Results The search resulted in 53 studies. Twenty-one studies met our review criteria. Integrative therapies identified included acupuncture/acupressure, aromatherapy, herbal supplements, hypnosis, and other cognitive behavioral interventions. Our review identified little information on the effectiveness and safety of most integrative therapeutic approaches for the control and management of CINV in children with cancer.
Conclusions However, evidence from adult cancer studies and some pediatric studies identify promising interventions for further testing.

5. Recommandation de bonne pratique

⊕ recommandation positive (quel que soit le niveau de preuve annoncé)
Ø recommandation négative (ou absence de preuve)

5.1. Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie (AGO, Allemagne) 2018 ⊕

Diagnosis and Treatment of Patients with Primary and Metastatic Breast Cancer. Complementary Therapy Survivorship. Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie (AGO). 2018;:35P. [182073].

(Electro)-Acupuncture as adjunct to entiemetic treatment in case of Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Level of evidence : 1b (individual RCT), grade of evidence (B), AGO recommendation grade (+) This examination or therapeutic intervention is for the patient of limited benefit and can be performed.

5.2. National Cancer Comprehensive Network (NCCN, USA) 2018 ⊕

NCCN Guidelines for Supportive Care : antiemesis. National Cancer Comprehensive Network. 2018;:68P. [188079].

Anticipatory nausea/vomiting : acupuncture/acupressure.

5.3. American Cancer Society / American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO, USA) 2018 ⊕

Lyman GH, Greenlee H, Bohlke K, Bao T, DeMichele AM, Deng GE, Fouladbakhsh JM, Gil B, Hershman DL, Mansfield S, Mussallem DM, Mustian KM, Price E, Rafte S, Cohen L. Integrative Therapies During and After Breast Cancer Treatment: ASCO Endorsement of the SIO Clinical Practice Guideline. J Clin Oncol. 2018;Jun 11. [155475].

Chemotherapy‐induced nausea and vomiting Recommendations: Acupressure can be considered as an addition to antiemetics drugs to control nausea and vomiting during chemotherapy (Strength of evidence : B). Electroacupuncture can be considered as an addition to antiemetics drugs to control vomiting during chemotherapy (Strength of evidence : B)

5.4. European School of Oncology (ESO) and the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2018 ⊕

Cardoso F, Senkus E, Costa A, Papadopoulos E, Aapro M, André F et al. 4th ESO-ESMO International Consensus Guidelines for Advanced Breast Cancer (ABC 4)†. Ann Oncol. 2018;29(8):1634-57. [196973].

Acupuncture may help against induced nausea and vomiting, fatigue and hot flashes;

5.5. Aetna (insurance provider, USA) 2018 ⊕

Acupuncture. Aetna (insurance provider, USA). 2018. 73P. [188029].

Aetna considers needle acupuncture (manual or electroacupuncture) medically necessary for any of the following indications:chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

5.6. Alberta Health Services 2017 (AHS, Canada) ⊕

Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting, Pediatric – Inpatient, Provincial Clinical Knowledge Topic. Alberta Health Services. 2017. 42p. [173086].

Consider using breakthrough CINV interventions : Acupressure or acupuncture.

5.7. American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO, USA) 2017 Ø

Hesketh PJ, Kris MG, Basch E, Bohlke K, Barbour SY, Clark-Snow RA, Danso MA, Dennis K, Dupuis LL, Dusetzina SB, Eng C, Feyer PC, Jordan K, Noonan K, Sparacio D, Somerfield MR, Lyman GH. Antiemetics: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update. J Clin Oncol. 2017;35(28):3240-61. [197509].

Complementary and alternative therapies: (Reworded for clarity) Evidence remains insufficient for a recommendation for or against the use of ginger, acupuncture/acupressure, and other complementary or alternative therapies for the prevention of nausea and vomiting in patients with cancer.

5.8. Association Francophone des Soins Oncologiques de Support (AFSOS, France) 2017 ⊕

Association Francophone des Soins Oncologiques de Support (AFSOS). Fiches Réferentiels ; Prise en charge des vomissements chimio-induits (MAJ 2017). [196582].

NVCI. Solutions non-médicamenteuses: acupuncture. En complément d'une prophylaxie médicamenteuse bien conduite (grade B de recommandation)

5.9. British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA, Canada) 2017 ⊕

Palliative Care for the Patient with Incurable Cancer or Advanced Disease Part 2: Pain and Symptom Management . Clinical Practice Guidelines and Protocols in British Columbia. 2017:47P. [197157].

Nausea and Vomiting: Non-pharmacological: modifications to diet (e.g., small bland meals) and environment (e.g., control smells and noise), relaxation and good oral hygiene, and acupressure (for chemotherapy-induced acute nausea, but not for delayed.

5.10. Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO, USA) 2017 ⊕

Greenlee H, DuPont-Reyes MJ, Balneaves LG et al. Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and after breast cancer treatment. CA Cancer J Clin. 2017 May 6;67(3):194-232. [158977].

Chemotherapy‐Induced Nausea and Vomiting : Acupressure can be considered as an addition to anti-emetics drugs to control nausea and vomiting during CT.(Strength of evidence : B) Acupuncture can be considered as an addition to anti-emetics drugs to control vomiting during CT.(Strength of evidence : B)

5.11. Emblemhealth (insurance provider, USA) 2017 ⊕

Acupuncture — Medicare Dual-Eligible Members Emblemhealth. 2017. [111547].

Members with the Medicare Dual-Eligible benefit are eligible for acupuncture when performed by an individual licensed by New York State to perform acupuncture and when performed for the following diagnoses: 1. Adult postoperative nausea and vomiting 2. Chemotherapy related nausea and vomiting 3. Pregnancy related nausea and vomiting 4. Carpal tunnel syndrome 5. Epicondylitis (tennis elbow) 6. Headache 7. Low back pain 8. Menstrual pain 9. Myofascial pain 10. Osteoarthritis

5.12. Ministry of Health (MOH, Malaysia) 2017 ⊕

Traditional and Complementary Medicine Practice Guideline on Acupuncture. Traditional and Complementary Medicine (T&CM) Division, Ministry of Health (MOH). Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 2017. 41p. [180540].

Acupuncture services offered at the T&CM Units of public healthcare facilities are indicated for: a) Post stroke management; b) Chronic pain management; and c) Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

5.13. American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO, USA) 2017 Ø

Hesketh PJ, Kris MG, Basch E, Bohlke K, Barbour SY, Clark-Snow RA, Danso MA, Dennis K, Dupuis LL, Dusetzina SB, Eng C, Feyer PC, Jordan K, Noonan K, Sparacio D, Somerfield MR, Lyman GH. Antiemetics: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update. J Clin Oncol. 2017;35(28):3240-61. [187938].

Recommendation 8. Evidence remains insufficient for a recommendation for or against the use of ginger, acupuncture/acupressure, and other complementary or alternative therapies for the prevention of nausea and vomiting in patients with cancer.

5.14. Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO, USA) 2014 ⊕

Greenlee H, Balneaves LG, Carlson LE, Cohen M, Deng G, Hershman D, Mumber M, Perlmutter J, Seely D, Sen A, Zick SM, Tripathy D; Society for Integrative Oncology. Clinical practice guidelines on the use of integrative therapies as supportive care in patients treated for breast cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 2014;50:346-58. [167074].

CINV. Recommendations: Acupressure can be considered for BC patients receiving CT as an addition to antiemetics to help control nausea and vomiting during CT. Electroacupuncture can be considered for BC patients as an addition to antiemetics to control vomiting during CT Strength of evidence: B

5.15. Association Francophone des Soins Oncologiques de Support (AFSOS) 2014 ⊕

Association Francophone des Soins Oncologiques de Support (AFSOS). Fiches Réferentiels : L’acupuncture en onco-hématologie MAJ 2014 (online)

Nausées et vomissements chimio-induits (N/V). L'acupuncture est indiquée en complément des traitements conventionnels dans la prise en charge des N/V induits par la chimiothérapie, en particulier les N/V aigus. Peu de données évaluent l'acupuncture dans les N/VN retardés. Les traitements conventionnels utilises et décrits dans la littérature ne font pas référence aux traitements de dernière génération (anti NK1 type aprepitant) (Niveau de preuve HAS : A)

5.16. European Partnership for Action Against Cancer (EPAA, Europe) 2014 ⊕

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in cancer care. Development and opportunities of Integrative Oncology. European Partnership for Action Against Cancer (EPAAC). 2014;:339P. [186081].

As to the use of acupuncture and TCM in the treatment of symptoms correlated to anti-cancer therapy, the literature has demonstrated a good level of evidence in the following cases: nausea and vomiting, pain, hotflashes and xerostomia, taking also in account the absence of relevant adverse effects and interactions.

5.17. American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP, USA) 2013 ⊕

Deng GE, Rausch SM, JoneS LW, Gulati A, Kumar NB, GreenleE H, Pietanza MC, Cassileth BR. Complementary therapies and integrative medicine in lung cancer: diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American College Of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines. Chest. 2013;143(5 Suppl):420-36. [159371].

Recommendation 2.5.3.1. In patients having nausea and vomiting from either chemotherapy or radiation therapy, acupuncture or related techniques is suggested as an adjunct treatment option (Grade 2B).

Acupuncture. U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. 2013.17p. [180539].

Category A (fair to high quality evidence): Authorized and recommended for routine use. Chemotherapy induced nausea/vomiting .

5.19. Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario (POGO, Canada) 2012 ⊕

Dupuis LL, Boodhan S, Holdsworth M, Robinson PD, Hain R, Portwine C, O'Shaughnessy E, Sung L. Guideline for the prevention of acute nausea and vomiting due to antineoplastic medication in pediatric cancer patients. Toronto (ON): Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario (POGO); 2012. 199 p. [155232].

What adjunctive non-pharmacological interventions provide control of acute AINV in children receiving antineoplastic agents of any emetic risk? Recommendation: We suggest that acupuncture, acupressure, guided imagery, music therapy, progressive muscle relaxation and psycho-educational support and information may be effective in children receiving antineoplastic agents. Virtual reality may convey benefit. (Weak recommendation Very low quality evidence)

5.20. American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO, USA) 2011 Ø

Basch E, Prestrud AA, Hesketh PJ, et al. Antiemetics: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update. J Clin Oncol. 2011;29(31):4189-98. [157361]

Recommendation 7. No published randomized controlled trial data that met inclusion criteria are currently available to support a recommendation about such therapies [complementary and alternative medicine therapies].
A Cochrane Systematic Review of acupuncture-point stimulation for CINV was published [Ezzo 2006]. However, this effort did not meet prespecified inclusion and exclusion criteria for this systematic review.

5.21. American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP, USA) 2007 ⊕

Cassileth BR, Deng GE, Gomez JE, Johnstone PA, Kumar N, Vickers AJ; American College of Chest Physicians. Complementary therapies and integrative oncology in lung cancer: Accp Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines (2nd Edition). Chest. 2007;132(3sup:340s-54s. [146961]

Recommendation 8. Acupuncture is recommended as a complementary therapy when nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy are poorly controlled. Grade of recommendation, 1B
Recommendation 9. Electrostimulation wristbands are not recommended for managing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Grade of recommendation, 1B

5.22. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE, UK) 2004 ⊕

Guidance on Cancer Services Improving Supportive and Palliative Care for Adults with Cancer. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines. 2004:209P. [197445].

There have been three systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials and studies of other complementary therapies, not limited exclusively to patients with cancer. Two provide some evidence of the benefits of aromatherapy in reducing anxiety [A] and acupuncture in reducing nausea and vomiting [A]. Preliminary results of a systematic review 152 11 of chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting is also positive for acupuncture14 [A]. There is some indication that therapies might have the ability to improve patients’ general sense of well-being and quality of life through, for instance, reductions in distress, anxiety, pain and nausea [B].

6. Essais contrôlés randomisés

6.1. Sources

Tous les ECR listés sont répertoriés dans la base de données Acudoc2. Les citations des ECR dans les revues systématiques et recommandations de bonne pratique sont rapportées dans le tableau ci-dessous. La mention Acudoc2 indique que l'ECR n'est pas cité, actuellement, par une revue systématique ou recommandation de bonne pratique.

Revues systématiques

  1. Lian 2014: Lian WL, Pan MQ, Zhou DH, Zhang ZJ. Effectiveness of acupuncture for palliative care in cancer patients: a systematic review. Chin J Integr Med. 2014.20(2):136-47
  2. Mvkeon 2013: Mckeon C, Smith CA, Hardy J, Chang E. Acupuncture and acupressure for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a systematic review. Aust J Acupunct Chin Med. 2013. 8(1):2-27. [160092].
  3. Garcia 2013: Garcia MK, Mcquade J, Haddad R, Patel S, Lee R, Yang P, Palmer JL, Cohen L. Systematic review of acupuncture in cancer care: a synthesis of the evidence. J Clin Oncol. 2013. 31(7):952-60.
  4. Silva 2009 : Silva, Dacirene Ribeiro França; Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz; Gomes, Isabelle Pimentel Gomes; Funghetto, Silvana Schwerz; Ponce de Leon, Casandra G. R. M. [Non Pharmacological Interventions for Chemotherapy Induced Nauseas and Vomits: integrative review]. Online Brazilian Journal of Nursing. 2009;8(1).
  5. Ezzo 2006: Ezzo JM, Richardson MA, Vickers A, Allen C, Dibble SL, Issell BF, Lao L, Pearl M, Ramirez G, Roscoe J, Shen J, Shivnan JC, Streitberger K, Treish I, Zhang G. Acupuncture-point stimulation for chemotherapy-induced nausea or vomiting. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2006;(2):CD002285.141212
  6. Klein 2004: Klein J, Griffiths P. Acupressure for nausea and vomiting in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, British Journal of Community Nursing. 2004. 9(9):383-88. [159378].

Recommandations de bonne pratique

  1. ASCO 2018: Lyman GH, Greenlee H, Bohlke K, Bao T et al. Integrative Therapies During and After Breast Cancer Treatment: ASCO Endorsement of the SIO Clinical Practice Guideline. J Clin Oncol. 2018 Jun 11:JCO2018792721. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2018.79.2721.
  2. ASCO 2017: Hesketh PJ, Kris MG, Basch E, Bohlke K, Barbour SY, Clark-Snow RA, Danso MA, Dennis K, Dupuis LL, Dusetzina SB, Eng C, Feyer PC, Jordan K, Noonan K, Sparacio D, Somerfield MR, Lyman GH. Antiemetics: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update. J Clin Oncol. 2017;35(28):3240-61. [187938].
  3. SIO 2014: Greenlee H, Balneaves LG, Carlson LE, Cohen M, Deng G, Hershman D, Mumber M, Perlmutter J, Seely D, Sen A, Zick SM, Tripathy D; Society for Integrative Oncology. Clinical practice guidelines on the use of integrative therapies as supportive care in patients treated for breast cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 2014;50:346-58. [167074].
  4. ACCP 2013: Deng GE, Rausch SM, JoneS LW, Gulati A, Kumar NB, GreenleE H, Pietanza MC, Cassileth BR. Complementary therapies and integrative medicine in lung cancer: diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American College Of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines. Chest. 2013;143(5 Suppl):420-36. [159371].
  5. ACCP 2007: Cassileth BR, Deng GE, Gomez JE, Johnstone PA, Kumar N, Vickers AJ; American College of Chest Physicians. Complementary therapies and integrative oncology in lung cancer: Accp Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines (2nd Edition). Chest. 2007;132(3sup:340s-54s. [146961]

6.2. Liste

Année Références Sources
2017 Feng Xiumei. [Clinical effect of acupuncture combined with acupoint massage on gastrointestinal reaction after chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer]. Journal of Modern Oncology. 2017;18:2922-5. [195857]. Acudoc2
Pu Zhong-Jian, Ma Xiao-Ping, Wang Ya-Jun, Sun Yuan-Peng. [Clinical Study on Different Acupuncture and Moxibustion Methods for Prevention and Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting Caused by Chemotherapy]. Chinese Journal of Information on Traditional Chinese Medicine. 2017;3:34-7. [195902]. Acudoc2
Xie J, Chen LH, Ning ZY, Zhang CY, Chen H, Chen Z, Meng ZQ, Zhu XY. Effect of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation combined with palonosetron on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a single-blind, randomized, controlled trial. Chin J Cancer. 2017;36(1):6. [166182] Acudoc2
2016 Avc HS, Ovayolu N, Ovayolu Ö. Effect of Acupressure on Nausea-Vomiting in Patients With Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia. Holist Nurs Pract. 2016;30(5):257-62. [187817]. Acudoc2
Eghbali M, Yekaninejad MS, Varaei S, Jalalinia SF Samimi MA, Sa'atchi K. The effect of auricular acupressure on nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy among breast cancer patients. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2016;:189-94. [188511]. Acudoc2
Hu Cuilian, Chen Chunyan, Wei Shuli. [The result detection of decreasing tumor chemotherapy by ear beans pressure and tsusanli acupuncture point acupoint injection]. Chinese Journal of Ethnomedicine and Ethnopharmacy. 2016;3:78-9. [52045]. Acudoc2
Liu Hong , Xu Tian-shu. [Clinical Study on Moxibustion Treatment for Nausea and Vomiting Induced by Cisplatin Clemotherapy] Journal of Clinical Acupuncture and Moxibustion. 2016;32(11):4. [188600]. Acudoc2
Xie Anwei, Niu Meie, Chan Yuying, Xu Yueye, Hu Shaoyan, Lin Xiaoxia. [Effect observation for Acupuncture therapy for chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal reaction in children with acute leukemia]. Journal of Nurses Training. 2016;6:488-91. [195876] Acudoc2
Xu Yin, Cheng Yongbo, Liu Li’ning, Yang Zhijun, An Junli, Handan Mingren Hospital. [Clinical Observation of Prevention for Gastrointestinal Symptoms Caused by Chemotherapy(Cisplatin) with Old Ten-Needles]. Chinese Archives of Traditional Chinese Medicine. 2016;2:359-61. [52068]. Acudoc2
2015 Chen Yan. [Observation on the clinical effect of mine fire moxibustion on the prevention of chemotherapy induced vomiting]. Dazhong Keji. 2015;8:99-101. [195933]. Acudoc2
Lai Milin, Liu Dan. [An Observation on Effect of Bo's Abdominal Acupuncture on Nausea and Vomiting after Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer]. Journal of Mathematical Medicine. 2015;9:1295-6. [52017] Acudoc2
Liang Xiaoning. [Prevention efficacy watch of Xiexin ginger decoction combined with acupuncture and vomiting after chemotherapy]. Dazhong Keji. 2015;6:97-8. [52067]. Acudoc2
Liu Jun, Xiao Yang, Guo Jianxiong, Liu Yangchen, Wei Wei, Zhou Juan. [Clinical trial of electronic antiemetic acupuncture in combination with palonosetron in prevention of tardive vomiting induced by highly emetogenic chemotherapy]. Chongqing Medical Journal. 2015;8:1087-90. [52106]. Acudoc2
Liu YQ, Sun S, Dong HJ, Zhai DX1, Zhang DY, Shen W, Bai LL, Yu J, Zhou LH, Yu CQ. Wrist-ankle acupuncture and ginger moxibustion for preventing gastrointestinal reactions to chemotherapy: A randomized controlled trial. Chin J Integr Med. 2015;21(9):697-702. [186899] Acudoc2
Mckeon C, Smith Ca, Gibbons K, Hardy J. EA versus sham acupuncture and no acupuncture for the control of acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a pilot study. Acupunct Med. 2015;33(4):277-83. [185627]. Acudoc2
Rithirangsriroj K, Manchana T, Akkayagorn L. Efficacy of acupuncture in prevention of delayed chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting in gynecologic cancer patients. Gynecol Oncol. 2015;136(1):82-6. [178355]. ASCO 2017
Shen Y, Liu L, Chiang Js, Meng Z, Garcia Mk, Chen Z, Peng H, Bei W, Zhao Q, Spelman AR, Cohen L. randomized, placebo-controlled trial of K1 acupoint acustimulation to prevent cisplatin-induced or oxaliplatin-induced nausea. Cancer. 2015;121(1):84-92. [178360]. Acudoc2
Tang Yanqing, Ma Hongmei, Wan Yonghui, Chen Sanmei, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University. [Clinical observation of electronic antiemetic acupuncture combined with tropisetron in the prevention of vomiting induced by cisplatin chemotherapy]. Journal of Modern Oncology. 2015;17:2491-4. [52218]. Acudoc2
2014 Molassiotis A, Russell W, Hughes J, Breckons M, Lloyd-Williams M, Richardson J, Hulme C, Brearley SG, Campbell M, Garrow A, Ryder WD. The effectiveness of acupressure for the control and management of chemotherapy-related acute and delayed nausea: a randomized controlled trial. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2014;47(1):12-25. [42611]. ASCO 2017
Wang Li-Na, Hu Hong-Yan, Qiu Yi-Ling, et al. Acupoint sticking at shenque (CV 8) with ginger-prepared ban xia (rhizoma pinelliae) for nausea and vomiting induced by amifostine. Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science. 2014;12(4):221. [187074]. Acudoc2
2013 Genç A, Can G, Aydiner A. The efficiency of the acupressure in prevention of the chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Support Care Cancer. 2013;21(1):253-61. [42617]. ASCO 2017
Xing Jin-Yun, Li Xue, Ren Xiu-Mei. [Therapeutic observation of abdominal acupuncture in preventing nausea and vomiting caused by cisplatin-based chemotherapy]. Shanghai Journal of Acupuncture and Moxibustion. 2013;32(12):1046. [178935]. Acudoc2
2012 Beith JM, Oh B, Chatfield MD, et al. Electroacupuncture for nausea, vomiting, and myelosuppression in women receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer: a randomized controlled pilot trial. Medical Acupuncture. 2012;24():241-8. [48548]. SIO 2014
Enblom A, Johnsson A, Hammar M, Onelöv E, Steineck G, Börjeson S. Acupuncture compared with placebo acupuncture in radiotherapy-induced nausea, a randomized controlled study. Annals of Oncology. 2012;23(5):1353-61. [160110]. ASCO 2017 - Garcia 2013 - ACCP 2013
Yeh CH, Chien LC, Chiang YC, Lin SW, Huang CK, Ren D. Reduction in nausea and vomiting in children undergoing cancer chemotherapy by either appropriate or sham auricular acupuncture points with standard care. J Altern Complement Med. 2012;18(4):334-40. [160068]. Acudoc2
2009 Sima L, Wang X. [Therapeutic effect of acupuncture on cisplatin-induced nausea and vomiting]. Zhongguo Zhen Jiu. 2009;29(1):3-6. [152395]. ACCP 2013
Yang Y, Zhang Y, Jing NC, et al. Electroacupuncture at Zusanli (ST 36) for treatment of nausea and vomiting caused by the chemotherapy of the malignant tumor: a multicentral randomized controlled trial [in Chinese]. Zhongguo Zhen Jiu. 2009;29(12):955-958 [154625]. Traduction anglaise International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture. 2010;2:53-59. [162878]. Lian 2014 - ACCP 2013 - Garcia 2013 -
You Q, Yu H, Wu D, Zhang Y, Zheng J, Peng C. Vitamin B6 points pc6 injection during acupuncture can relieve nausea and vomiting in patients with ovarian cancer. Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2009;19(4):567-71. [153307]. ACCP 2013
2008 Gottschling S, Reindl TK, Meyer S, Berrang J, Henze G, Graeber S, Ong MF, Graf N. Acupuncture to alleviate chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in pediatric oncology - a randomized multicenter crossover pilot trial. Klin Padiatr. 2008;220(6):365-70. [152496]. ACCP 2013 - Garcia 2013 - Mckeon 2013
Jones E, Isom S, Kemper KJ, Mclean TW. Acupressure for chemotherapy-associated nausea and vomiting in children. J Soc Integr Oncol. 2008;6(4):141-5. [159475]. Mckeon 2013 -
Huang Zhifen, Shi Zhiyan, Li Hanzhong, Tan Zhiqiang. [Clinical observation on acupuncture at Neiguan and Zusanli for prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal reactions induced by Cisplatin and other chemotherapy]. Liaoning Journal of TCM. 2008;35(6):917-9. [195813]. Lian 2014
2007 Dibble SL, Luce J, Cooper BA, Israel J, Cohen M, Nussey B, Rugo H. Acupressure for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a randomized clinical trial. Oncol Nurs Forum. 2007;34(4):813-20. [147054]. SIO 2014 - Mckeon 2013 - Lee 2008
Molassiotis A, Helin AM, Dabbour R, Hummerston S. The Effects of P6 acupressure in the prophylaxis of chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting in breast cancer patients. Complementary Therapies in Medicine. 2007;15(1):3-12. [145588]. SIO 2014 - Mckeon 2013 - Silva 2009 - Lee 2008
2006 Fu J, Meng Zq, Chen Z, Peng Ht, Liu Lm. [Clinical observation on electric stimulation of yongquan ( KI 1 ) for prevention of nausea and vomiting induced by cisplatin]. Chinese Acupuncture AND Moxibustion. 2006;26(4):250-2. [125817]. Lian 2014
Melchart D, Ihbe-Heffinger A, Leps B, von Schilling C, Linde K. Acupuncture and acupressure for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea–a randomised cross-over pilot study. Support Care Cancer. 2006;14(8):878–82. [141161] Garcia 2013 - Silva 2009 - Lee 2008
Reindl TK, Geilen W, Hartmann R, Wiebelitz KR, Kan G, Wilhelm I, Lugauer S, Behrens C, Weiberlenn T, Hasan C, Gottschling S, Wild-Bergner T, Henze G, Driever PH. Acupuncture against chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in pediatric oncology interim results of a multicenter crossover study. Support Care Cancer. 2006;14(2):172-6. [140635]. Mckeon 2013
Roscoe JA, Jean-Pierre P, Morrow GR, et al. Exploratory analysis of the usefulness of acupressure bands when severe chemotherapy-related nausea is expected. J Soc Integr Oncol 2006;4(1):16-20. [160029]. Lee 2008
Zhang Qing, Wang Xiaomin, Hu Fengshan, Zhao Wenshuo. [Clinical observation on acupuncture at specific acupoints for prevention and treatment of cancer patients with vomiting induced by chemotherapy]. Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine. 2006;47(3):209-10. [195812]. Lian 2014
2005 Roscoe JA, Matteson SE, Morrow GR, HickokJT, Bushunow P, Griggs J, Gazi R, Smith B, Kramer Z, Smith J. Acustimulation wrist bands are not effective for the control of chemotherapy-induced nausea in women with breast cancer. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2005;29(4):376-84. [136594]. Silva 2009
2004 Chen Chuang, Zhang Zuojun, Li Hanzhong, Tan Zhiqiang, Lu Yongkui, Huang Zhifen. [Clinical cbservation on electro-acupuncture at Zusanli for reduction of toxicity caused by chemotherapy]. New Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine. 2004;36(3):46-7. [195829]. Lian 2014
Shi Q. [Clinical observation on efficacy of acupuncture at Zusanli, Neiguan in prevention of chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal reactions]. Clinical Journal of Chinese Medicine. 2004;16:481. [195831] Lian 2014
2003 Roscoe JA, Morrow GR, Hickok JT, Bushunow P, Pierce HI, Flynn PJ, Kirshner JJ, Moore DF, Atkins JN. The Efficacy of acupressure and acustimulation wrist bands for the relief of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, J Pain Symptom Manage. 2003;26(2):731-42. [160043]. Mckeon 2013 - Lee 2008 - ACCP 2007 - Ezzo 2006 - Klein 2004
Streitberger K, Friedrich-Rust M, Bardenheuer H. Effect of acupuncture compared with placebo-acupuncture at p6 as additional antiemetic prophylaxis in high-dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: a randomized co. Clin Cancer Res. 2003;9(7):2538-44.. [117403]. Lian 2014 - Mckeon 2013 - Garcia 2013 - ACCP 2007 - Ezzo 2006
Treish I, Shord S, Valgus J, et al. Randomized double-blind study of the Reliefband as an adjunct to standard antiemetics in patients receiving moderately high to highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Sup- portive Cancer Care 2003;8:515{21. [160189] Ezzo 2006
2002 Noga S, Tolman A, Roman J, et al. Acupressure as an adjunct to pharmacologic control of nausea, vomiting and retching (N/V) during blood and marrow transplantation (BMT): a randomized, placebocontrolled, algorithm based study. Proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. 2002; Vol. 21:361a. [48574]. Lee 2008 - Ezzo 2006
Roscoe J, Morrow G, Bushunow P, et al. Acustimulation wristbands for the relief of chemotherapy-induced nausea. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine 2002;8(4):56-63. [19107]. Ezzo 2006
2001 Meyer CD. Efficacy of acupressure treatment at neiguan point with acupressure bands for chemotherapy- induced nausea, vomiting, and retching. Pittsburgh, PA : School of Nursing, Duquesne University. 2001. [51985].. Lee 2008
2000 Dibble SL, Chapman J, Mack KA, Shih AS. Acupressure for nausea: results of a pilot study. Oncol Nurs Forum. 2000;27(1):41-7. [71663]. Lian 2014 - SIO 2014 - Mckeon 2013 - Garcia 2013 - Lee 2008 - Ezzo 2006 - Klein 2004
Shen J, Wenger N, Glaspy J, Hays RD, Albert PS, Choi C, Shekelle PG. Electroacupuncture for control of myeloablative chemotherapy-induced emesis. a randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 2000;284(21):2755-61. [77145]. SIO 2014 - Mckeon 2013 - Silva 2009 - ACCP 2007 - Ezzo 2006
Xia Yue-Shan et al. Acupuncture plus ear-points press in preventing vomiting induced by chemotherapy with cisplatin. International Journal of Clinical Acupuncture. 2000;11(2):145-8. [72185] Acudoc2
Melchart D, Ihbe-Heffinger A, Leps B, Von Schilling C, Linde K. Acupuncture and acupressure for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea-a randomised cross-over pilot study. Support Care Cancer. 2006;14(8):878-82. [141161]. Acudoc2
1999 Pearl M, Fischer M, McCauley D, et al. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation as an adjunct for controlling chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in gynecologic oncology patients. Cancer Nursing 1999;22(4):307-11. [101056]. Ezzo 2006
1998 Li Hua et al. Clinical study on acupuncture treatment of side reactions of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for malignant tumor. World Journal of Acupuncture-Moxibustion. 1998;8(2):8-12. [68449]. Lian 2014
Lo L. Effect of acupressure on acute and delayed nausea and vomiting in children receiving chemotherapy [thesis] School of Nursing Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, 1998. [5789]. Lee 2008
1992 Price H, Williams CJ, Sergiou K. A randomized trial of acupressure for chemotherapy induced emesis. Proceedings of ASCO [abstr 1394], San Diego, CA, 1992. [5796]. Lee 2008
1991 McMillan C, Dundee J. The role of transcutaneous electrical stimulation of neiguan anti-emetic acupuncture point in controlling sickness after cancer chemotherapy. Physiotherapy 1991;77:499{502. [50615]. Ezzo 2006
Price H, Lewith G, Williams C. Acupressure as an antiemetic in cancer chemotherapy. Complementary Medical Research. 1991;5(2):93-4. [29384] Acudoc2
1988 Dundee JW, Ghaly RG, Fitzpatrick KT. Randomized comparison of the anti-emetic effects of Metoclopramide and electro acupuncture in cancer chemotherapy. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 1988;25:678-9. [85022]. Mckeon 2013 - Garcia 2013 - Ezzo 2006
1987 Dundee JW, Ghaly RG, Fitzpatrick KT, Lynch GA, Abram WP. Acupuncture to prevent cisplatin-associated vomiting. Lancet. 1987;1(8541): [38868]. Mckeon 2013 - Garcia 2013 - Ezzo 2006
1986 Xia Yuqing et al. An approach to the effect on tumors of acupuncture in combination with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Journal of TCM. 1986;6(1):23-6. [15116]. Lian 2014 - Garcia 2013